borderland studies

Since 2015 I have travelled three times to Lower Silesia, Poland, where my father’s family lived for centuries under Bohemian, Prussian, and German rule. Their homes were in regional villages south of Wroclaw, a thousand-year old city. The earliest Silesians were migratory tribes. Traces of Stone Age habitation were found on the city’s riverbanks and Celtic populations passed through and moved on. Silesia was claimed by the kingdom of Poland shortly before the year 1000, followed by various competing rulerships and kingdoms as the land was bought, sold, given and taken in marriages between revolving political and religious controls, becoming finally a province of the Republic of Germany until it was annexed to Poland after WW2. My relations, along with most ethnic Germans, were expelled to the west, leaving their homes and properties behind.

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Arrival: Village of the Ancestors, 2018

While in Silesia I filmed sites and recorded interviews for my media project, Borderland Memories. I was a visiting researcher on a team from Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland, and my project was funded in part by the Canada Council for the Arts (2018).

 

 

Flânerie in Detroit

IMG_0354In June I attended a conference of the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment, Rust/Resistance: Works of Recovery, at Wayne State University in Detroit. I presented media and writing from my project in progress, Borderland Memories in Lower Silesia. It was my first time back to Detroit in many years and my only previous encounter with the city was at the Greyhound bus depot, en route to Ann Arbor Film Festival. As I walked among the ruins and some wonderful old architectures, I found myself in a city of hidden stories with much heart. Filmmaker Patrick Keiller wrote, “The present day flâneur carries a camera” and travels in some kind of vehicle (The View From the Train: Cities and Other Landscapes, 2013).

films at Workers Arts & Heritage Centre

My film “Northland: Long Journey” is playing in the program Labour and Love as part of 150 seconds of Ontario Film Festival.

NORTHLAND-1984 Mine Shaft

The research I cited for this project ten years ago, in part for my doctorate in Environmental Studies, was recently connected to new media stories. In the film, I interview a number of experts on the issue of aluminum prophylaxis. You can hear some of their comments in the film’s trailer, and read some 2017 news stories online at these links:

 

https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/04/15/in-human-experiment-ontario-miners-say-they-paid-devastating-price.html

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorials/2017/04/18/do-right-by-injured-miners-editorial.html

traveling films

A traveling film festival goes to some interesting places that a big metropolitan festival does not. There’s culture in the rural, and expanded landscapes inform regional communities. Conversations on the Lakean environmental documentary about the rural places of my childhood in towns bordering Lake Superior, has screened in several Northern Ontario venues and festivals, traveled through parts of India in Voices From the Waters, and in rural southern USA locations in the Ozark Shorts Film Festival, Ozark Mountains regional festival, USA. 

These rural communities are participants in helping to shape critical environmental discourses around water, land, and community, within multi-vocal themes and expressions.

Manitouwadge Lake with Red Pole

Manitouwadge Lake with Red Pole, 2012

northern journeys…

Distance is measured differently in places where the land is wide with many spaces mostly populated by more than human others. In Northern Ontario where I grew up, we could visit our neighbours two hundred kilometers away for lunch and be home later that day for supper. Now I live in Toronto where driving a mere ninety kilometers north constitutes a road trip. Recently I was north again, to participate as a mentor on workshops about knowledge mobilization and multi-media, produced by Docs North in Thunder Bay, home of the Bay Street Film Festival, and some of us there had a conversation about how distance is embodied in the north for those who live there, and still for those of us who went south …

NORTHLAND-Red Motel, 2004                             “Red Motel” (2005) from the series Northland.

music channel on SoundCloud

For many years I’ve recorded music for my films and sometimes for live performance projects, beginning with film performances at The Funnel. For a history of The Funnel collective and its artists, see Mike Hoolboom’s research project, which includes my interview and many others: http://mikehoolboom.com/?p=12552

Here is a sample collection of recordings: https://soundcloud.com/edie-steiner produced in collaboration with Canadian artists Chip Yarwood, Malcolm Lewis, Michael Phillip Wojewoda, and Australian composers Colin Offord and Daniel Rojas. Among my published works is the text for Colin Offord’s Bold New Strategies Suite (EMI International, 1999). Here is Colin in concert, performing Part 1, “I See A Journey”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoZvrbGiIKo

 

book review

Here is another book review I’ve written for The Goose – a publication by the Association for the Study of Literature, Environment, and Culture in Canada (ALECC). The text is Adrian J. Ivakhiv’s  “Ecologies of the Moving Image: Cinema, Affect, Nature.” For serious film studies or ecological cinema studies readers, this book is an amazing resource. Read my review at: http://scholars.wlu.ca/thegoose/vol13/iss2/28

photo/video gallery installation

This exhibition is the culmination of a 10-year photographic documentation of a particular view from my home on Toronto’s waterfront, facing north. In the decade between 2004 to 2014, the visible landscape has changed tremendously, as a once wide view of the city gradually becomes an increasingly enclosed space.